International Society for History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Biology


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Program

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8  /  11:00 - 12:30  /  DS-R525
Organized session / diverse format
Heredity and transmission: discussion across the disciplines (LabEx “Who Am I?”)
Organizer(s):

Antonine Nicoglou (LabEx "Who am I?", France); Jean Gayon (IHPST/ Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, France); François Villa (Université Paris Diderot - Paris 7, France); Jonathan Weitzman (Université Paris Diderot - Paris 7, France)


Participant(s):

Jean Gayon (IHPST/ Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, France)
François Villa (Université Paris Diderot - Paris 7, France)
Jonathan Weitzman (Université Paris Diderot - Paris 7, France)

Current discoveries regarding “non-Mendelian” effects and epigenetic mechanisms have opened debate among biologists about the nature of extended inheritance, its prominence in biological systems and its impact on evolution. In light of these issues, it is timely to explore anew the concept of transmission, while acknowledging that heredity must go beyond the genetic perspective. This project should draw on an integrated dialogue between the disciplines studying biological systems. The purpose of this round table is to generate discussion between team leaders in different fields (i.e., cellular biology, evolutionary and developmental genetics, psychology & psychoanalysis, philosophy of biology), who are all interested in the same question: how are complex factors – be they psychological or behavioral traits, based on a ‘cultural’ and/or ‘parental’ environments – transmitted, if not through the genes? More broadly, one of the purposes of the session will be to investigate the “nature/culture” distinction and how the contours of the “nature-nurture debate” could be defined. Each of the team leaders from different disciplines will begin by addressing the question: “What does ‘transmission’ mean to you?” This discussion will highlight similarities and differences between the disciplines and define a common ground to open the debate.